Best of Namibia Wildlife, Scenery & Culture

The dream itinerary with a perfect mix of wildlife safari, amazing landscapes and authentic cultural experiences, yet it is safe and full of historic elements at the same time.

Description

If you are looking for an African destination that is a perfect mix of wildlife safari, amazing landscapes and authentic cultural experiences, yet it is safe and full of historic elements at the same time, you have found your dream itinerary! Namibia is truly the most scenic country on the African continent, featuring giant sand dunes, granite rock formations, breathtaking beaches, vast expanses of the Kalahari bush, rolling farm hills, dry lake bottoms and a great variety of valuable habitats for wildlife. Several of its original inhabitants preserved their traditional lifestyle and are happy to share it with visitors, while the low population allowed for the establishment of a huge array of protected areas, private conservancies and natural parks. Namibia is beautiful, safe and diverse; this trip is a must for the adventure traveler.

Itinerary

Day 1 : Hotel Thule

Welcome to Namibia! You will be met at Windhoek International Airport in the arrivals hall with your name on a sign board. You will be transferred to your lodge for this evening where you will be able to rest after your long journey!

Situated in Central Namibia, the cosmopolitan city of Windhoek serves as the capital of the country. It is home to an international airport and a plethora of restaurants, shops, entertainment venues and accommodation options. The city is clean, safe and well-organised, with a colonial legacy that is reflected in its many German eateries and shops, and the widespread use of the German language. Windhoek has an interesting mix of historical architecture and modern buildings, many of which are worth a look, including the Alte Feste an old fort, the 1896 Christuskirche Christ Church, and the more contemporary Supreme Court.

Hotel Thule is an upmarket, 25 room hotel, located 5 minutes from the city centre of Windhoek. It offers conference facilities and a boardroom, a lapa perfect for functions and special events, and a restaurant serving fine Namibian cuisine. Hotel Thule is renowned for its sundowners, being perched on a hilltop, thus offering stunning views over the city of Windhoek.

Day 2 : Erindi Old Traders Lodge

After breakfast and will be on the road northbound. Our morning is dedicated to a straight drive, interrupted by a nice lunch break only, in order to be able to cover the 300 km distance to Erindi Private Game Reserve – the world’s largest private nature reserve and the perfect introduction to African wildlife on this itinerary. We plan to check in at our lovely African safari lodge at around two in the afternoon, and proceed for a unique game drive after some refreshments and a short break. Erindi has an incredible diversity of wildlife species with regular sightings of Lion, Cheetah, Wild Dog, Elephant, Hippo, Giraffe, Black Rhino, White Rhino and Zebra. We will only return to our accommodation with the setting sun, and prepare for a much-deserved dinner under the vast, open, star-filled African sky.

Conveniently located only a few hours drive from Namibia’s capital city of Windhoek, the Erongo Mountain Range stretches across the plains between the towns of Omaruru and Karibib, and is home to a remarkably rich natural heritage. This expanse of rugged wilderness serves as one of Namibia’s most popular tourist drawcards, attracting visitors with its spectacularly scenic landscapes, magnificent caves and rock painting sites, and its impressive array of wildlife species. These include, among others: rhino, elephant, cheetah, leopard, giraffe, wildebeest, impala, blesbok, waterbuck, kudu, warthog, mountain zebra, oryx, eland, springbok and over 200 species of bird. Visitors can look forward to enjoying a variety of adventurous activities such as hiking, rock climbing, games drives, horse riding safaris and mountain biking.

Erindi Game Reserve is a jewel in the heart of the wild Namibian landscape. The reserve of 70 000ha is situated 40km east of the town of Omaruru.

Old Traders Lodge provides the accommodation at Erindi Private Game Reserve. This impressive lodge comprises the main dining room and viewing deck as well as 35 well appointed suites that all have views of a water hole. The spacious suites include; comfortable double or twin single beds with crisp linen and warm blankets, air-conditioning, en-suite bathroom with bath and shower, in-room safe, satellite TV, hairdryers, fridges and kettles.

Erindi falls within the Nama Karoo biome and is arid to semi-arid characterized by scattered low dwarf shrubs interspersed with grasslands. Erindi consists of an amazing array of diverse landscapes including mountains, riverine thickets, inselbergs (“island mountains”) and grassland savannahs for as far as the eye can see.

Day 3 : Roy’s Rest Camp

Today along with the rising sun we will be in the bush again, on our open safari trucks, in search of Elephant and Rhino, as well as Lion and Cheetahs and many other species of the African fauna. A full, cooked breakfast will attract us back to the lodge after a couple of hours, but we will hit the road again as soon as our dietary needs are provided for. We are heading to one of the most remote corners of Namibia today, a vast bush land, home to the San people, to where very few dedicated travellers ever venture. After a quick stop to admire the worlds largest know meteorite at Hoba, we enjoy lunch in Grootfontein, and make our way north to our lodge where we will spend the night. Roy’s Camp is situated on a game farm and is the perfect base from which to explore and spend time with the Bushman/San people. We plan to reach our lodge just before the sun sets, so that we can enjoy the evening with a drink in our hands under the tall thatched roof of the restaurant area, followed by dinner and an early bed time.

Situated in the Otjozondjupa Province, in the centre of what is known as the ‘Golden Triangle’, the towering Otavi Mountains are surrounded by the Northern Namibian towns of Otavi, Tsumeb, and Grootfontein, which are roughly 60 kilometres equidistant from each other. The landscape features golden maize plantations, spectacular dolomite mountains, and underground lakes. Visitors to this spectacular region can look forward to a variety of activities including: visiting the Hoba Meteorite, the largest ‘space object’ on earth and a national monument; explore Dragon’s Breath Cave which holds world’s largest underground lake; or viewing the bottomless ‘sinkhole’ Lake Otkikoto, boasting emerald green water is one of two permanent lakes in Namibia. Other interesting activities include: hiking, biking, fishing, off-roading, and game viewing safaris. Don’t miss the impressive Gaub Cave, filled with sensational stalactites and stalagmites.

Roy’s Rest Camp is a small part of the farm Elandslaagte. The camp was started in 1995 and was built for cattle farming and tourism as the main industries. Elandslaagte is one of the older farms in the district of Grootfontein, and has been in operation since 1930. Roy’s Camp is situated on the main road from Grootfontein to Rundu, 55 km north of Grootfontein. It is an ideal stopover from northern Namibia to Caprivi and bushman land. There are 5 standard rooms and 2 family rooms all with en suite facilities and private braai areas. The camp bungalows are of a unique rustic design. All rooms have air conditioning and mosquito nets. There are also 16 campsites with braai facilities and hot water.

Hoba Meteorite is the largest known meteorite ever to hit the planet is thought to have done so approximately 80,000 years ago, when it landed in a remote part of Namibia. It was only unearthed many centuries later in 1920, when a farmer tilling his fields stumbled upon it. It was excavated but not transported, due to its stupendous weight of approximately 60 tons, and today can still be viewed at the original site of its discovery. Thought to be between 200 and 400 million years old, it is the biggest organic chunk of iron known to man, but also contains traces of substances which do not occur naturally on earth. It measures roughly three metres by three metres, with an average thickness of approximately one metre.

Day 4 – 6 : Mushara Lodge

After a relaxing breakfast we will be in the vehicle and make our way to meet up with the Ju/’hoansi Bushman, who live in small villages scattered across Bushmanland. After a quick introduction and greeting ceremony, we set off right away, deep into the bush, with the village hunters, and spend most of the morning with them, looking for anything to prey on with their poisoned arrows, as well as for edible roots, berries, honey and whatever else would be welcomed by the villagers. We will break for an early lunch and coffee before we are back in the village again, interacting with the women whose job is to process whatever the hunters brought home from our morning excursion. If we are lucky, the villagers will have a good harvest or any other reasons to celebrate tonight, so that we can stay and participate in an original, traditional, non-organized singing and dancing event, before we make our way to Mushara Lodge situated on the boundary of Etosha National Park where we will spend the next 2 nights.

Located in North-western Namibia, Etosha East is a protected sanctuary in the eastern part of the world-renowned Etosha National Park, known as one of the most accessible game reserves in Southern Africa. Etosha East boasts vast open plains scattered with semi-arid savannah grasslands dotted with watering holes and secluded bush camps. An impressive 5000-square-kilometre Etosha salt pan makes up a large area of the eastern side of the park and can even be seen from space. This remote area teems with abundant wildlife such as lions, elephants, black rhinos and giraffes, as well as a variety of birdlife featuring flamingos, ostriches, eagles, hornbills, and owls.

Located only 8kms from the Von Lindequist Gate on the eastern outskirts of the Etosha National Park, Mushara Lodge is ideally situated for travellers visiting the park.
Our Lodge consists of ten spacious chalets, one family unit and two single rooms.
The name Mushara derives from the Purple Pod Terminalia tree, which grows in abundance in the lodge grounds and the surrounding area. The thatched public area consists of a small library with a selection of good books, a bar with an extensive wine cellar, airy lounge with welcoming fireplace for winter evenings, a dining area and well stocked curio shop.

After breakfast on day 5, we will explore the game rich eastern section of the park. We plan to do a full morning game drive and arrive back at the lodge around lunchtime and after siesta we will be back in the park for an afternoon game drive. One of the most unique phenomena we will encounter this afternoon is Etosha Pan – a huge, 130km long and 50 km wide ‘nothing’. This is the dry, flat, endless bottom of the occasionally flooded Etosha Pan, a ‘must see’ for all adventurers. Naturally, the park consists of many more habitats as well, most of which are lush and very much habitable for wildlife, making Etosha one of the best safari destinations in Africa.

Etosha East is located in North-western Namibia, Etosha East is a protected sanctuary in the eastern part of the world-renowned Etosha National Park, known as one of the most accessible game reserves in Southern Africa. Etosha East boasts vast open plains scattered with semi-arid savannah grasslands dotted with watering holes and secluded bush camps. An impressive 5000-square-kilometre Etosha salt pan makes up a large area of the eastern side of the park and can even be seen from space. This remote area teems with abundant wildlife such as lions, elephants, black rhinos and giraffes, as well as a variety of birdlife featuring flamingos, ostriches, eagles, hornbills, and owls.

Day 6 : Etosha Safari Lodge

Our entire day is dedicated for wildlife viewing in Etosha National Park. The rising sun will find us on the remote game drive routes across the park and along Etosha Pan, in search of the world’s largest (tallest) elephants and many other unique animals, along with endemic and rare bird species. We will stop for lunch en route and we should be at our lodge by mid to late afternoon. One of the great features of Okaukeujo is the flood-lit waterhole at the lodge which gives us the chance to enjoy game viewing long after the sun has set.

Located just south of the boundary of Etosha National Park in north-western Namibia, Etosha South makes up the southern region of this wild paradise. The national park can be accessed via the southern entrance at Andersson’s Gate. Visitors can catch a glimpse of a variety of wildlife including: lion, giraffe, elephant, white and black rhino, and a multitude of plains game.

Guests rave about the view: the restaurant and chalets, situated on a hillock, offer magnificent views of the African bush savannah. All of the 65 double room chalets have air conditioners and mosquito nets, and a choice of three swimming pools between them. Apart from the restaurant and bar there is a wooden platform for sundowners high above the Mopani bush. The Andersson Gate into Etosha National Park is a mere 9 km away. Those who do not want to drive themselves can join one of the lodge’s daily safari trips into the park.

Etosha Pan – Aeons ago, Etosha Pan was the bed of a vast lake; today what remains is a glittering, silvery-green salt pan that stretches across roughly 5000 square kilometres. Etosha is protected by the Etosha Pan National Park surrounded by savannah plains and woodlands supporting large herds of elephants. When dry, the pan sustains little life except for the algae that gives it its distinctive colour, and migratory birds that use it as a pit stop, but with heavy rain it becomes a shallow lake where flamingos breed, pelicans wade and feed, and a variety of mammal species come to quench their thirst, including leopards, lions, white rhinos, hunting dogs and antelopes.

On day 7 we will do morning and afternoon games drives and relax at the pool or camp waterhole between drives.

Etosha West – the area and vegetation is very different to the south-eastern and eastern part of the park and the Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra can be found here. In this area and with a more undulating landscape, it makes for a very different wildlife experience. White dust and clay which makes up the Etosha Pan turns to a reddish-brown soil during this time which may lead you to believe you have entered an entirely new park when you visit.

Day 8 : Opuwo Country Lodge

Today we are heading to the exciting northern tribal territories of Namibia and have a long road trip ahead of us, so we check out of our lodge very early and drive out of the park within a couple of hours. Naturally, we will stop for great wildlife sightings, but overall, we will leave the park behind relatively early and make our way to a small town called Opuwo in the north. We are in the heartland of Kaokoland, known for its exciting Himba tribal villages and traditions, as well as the unique ‘desert elephants’ and other species that can’t be found elsewhere in Namibia. We plan on arriving in time for lunch and the afternoon is dedicated to the amazing Himba people – the last truly nomadic tribe in Namibia. We will be back at the lodge situated on top of a hill overlooking Kaokoland to enjoy a beautiful sunset and a well-deserved dinner.

Opuwo, meaning ‘the end’ in Herero, lies in the north western Kunene region of Namibia. It serves as the capital of the region and is known as the gateway to the magnificent Epupa Falls. The surrounding landscape is characterised by low-lying hills, and vast dry desert plains inhabited by a wealth of desert-adapted wildlife. It serves as the central hub for the Himba culture. The town provides a perfect base for visitors wishing to explore the Kaokoland area and visit the local villages of the itinerant Himba people. The town and the Opuwo surrounding area is known as one of the cultural highlights of a trip to Namibia as it features an incredibly rich cultural heritage. Don’t miss an opportunity to learn about the fascinating Himba community within this starkly beautiful landscape.

Opuwo Country Lodge is situated on a northwest facing hilltop just outside the town of Opuwo. An awe-inspiring 360o view of the surrounding area gives visitors a spectacular vantage point of the surrounding area. With luxury and standard accommodation, air conditioning, as well as well-appointed camping sites — the Lodge is the ideal base from which to explore the Kaokoland. Deck chairs and umbrellas set the scene for a relaxed day around the pool or a welcome respite from the heat after a hard day’s drive. Next to the pool is the Bar and Restaurant where guests can enjoy ice cold refreshments and mouth-watering meals. The lodge is within easy reach of Kaoko-Otavi, Epupa Falls and Swartbooisdrift, popular destinations for visitors to the area.

Road conditions between Kamanjab and Opuwo are in excellent condition (tarmac). The 85 km to Ruacana is also a tarmac road and in excellent driving condition.

Fly-in guests are welcome. Please be sure to arrange for pickup before your arrival. The lodge is unfortunately not suitable for guests in wheel chairs.

Day 9 : Twyfelfontein Country Lodge

After breakfast this morning, we head directly south, through dry riverbeds and rocky plains, until we reach the edge of Damaraland, where the landscape suddenly changes into one of the most spectacular and dramatic in Namibia. Damaraland boasts magnificent desert scenery, fascinating geological formations, archaeological sites and a unique variety of desert fauna and flora. It is also the southernmost roaming ground for the rare black rhino and the ‘desert adapted elephant’, which we will keep searching for all along. After a picnic lunch en route, we will stop to admire the 260 million years old logs of the Petrified Forest, as well as a beautiful, impressive specimen of Welwitschia mirabilis, the longest-lived plant on Earth. Before we check into our lodge this evening, we visit the geological formations of the ‘Burnt Mountain’ and the ‘Organ Pipes’, which are particularly stunning in the late afternoon golden light. After sunset, we quickly occupy our rooms and gather for a great dinner.
Set in the Kunene Region of northwestern Namibia, Twylfelfontein is a spectacularly scenic area, featuring one of the largest and most important concentrations of rock art in Africa. The name ‘Twyfelfontein’ translates to ‘Fountain of Doubt’, which refers to the perennial spring situated in the impressive Huab valley flanked by the slopes of a sandstone table mountain. It was this spring that attracted Stone Age hunters over six thousand years ago, and it was during this time that the extensive group of rock engravings and paintings were produced. Visitors can look forward to basing themselves at some wonderfully shady campsites along the Aba-Huab riverbed, while exploring over thirty different sites of these sacred records of ritual practices relating to traditional hunter-gatherer communities.

The Lodge is situated in the heart of the Twyfelfontein Uibasen Conservancy and boast 56 en-suite twin rooms, reception, lounge, curio shop, open dining room, bar and swimming pool. In construction utmost care was taken to reduce the visual impact on the environment and to blend into the mountainside with the use of thatch roofs, natural stone and paint colours toning in with the surrounding rock formations.

Day 10 – 12 : Strand Hotel Swakopmund

After breakfast, we start the morning with a visit to Twyfelfontein world heritage site, where bushman communities engraved and painted over 2500 pictures some 6000 years ago. This will be followed by a very interesting visit to a Damara village, before we reach the abandoned mining town of Uis. We will take a short break here to photograph the buildings and learn about the history of mining in Namibia, before continuing towards the Atlantic Coast. This route crosses the desolate ‘gravel plains’ of the Namib Desert before arriving at the ‘Skeleton Coast’. After a nice lunch break on the roadside, we reach the ocean and turn northbound, in order to visit Cape Cross and its world famous Cape Fur Seal colony. We will take our time to adequately explore, enjoy and photograph the 80.000 inhabitants of the colony, before we continue south along the coast and make our way to Swakopmund – the first place with a real town feeling, since we have left Windhoek ten days ago! After a quick check-in at our city hotel, we use the remaining hour or two of the daylight, to explore this charming coastal city, booming in the middle of hostile desert environment. We will all be back at our hotel after sunset, for a nice dinner and a great night’s rest.
Founded in 1892 as the main harbour for German South West Africa, Swakopmund is often described as being more German than Germany. Now a seaside resort, Swakopmund is the capital of the Skeleton Coast tourism area and has plenty to keep visitors happy. The quirky mix of German and Namibian influences, colonial-era buildings and the cool sea breeze make it very popular.

With its extensive, unique and creatively entertaining Restaurants, Bars, Deli, Lobby-Lounge, Sea Facing Terraces, Beach Kiosk and state of the art Conference & Banqueting Center, all set on the Mole, a historic and iconic site surrounded by Ocean on three sides, the Strand Hotel Swakopmund is a social epicenter and destination in itself for all visitors to and residents of Swakopmund.
Its architectural inspiration finds its roots deep in Namibian-German history and reflects this in a tasteful contemporary manner. The interiors are residential in nature, and the brief to all designers involved was to create a non-hotel, hotel. One as charming and welcoming as the town it is located in. Simply very warm and comfortable, and as they say in German: “gemütlich” providing a genuine “sense-of-place” atmosphere adding to any Namibian visit.

Arriving at the Strand is a dramatic experience as one passes through its 13m high and 9m wide Ocean View Atrium which travels right through the Hotel offering sea views at either end. Off this Atrium Lobby is Reception, consisting of three individual desks and an inviting open fireplace which rounds off the residential feel and warm welcome.

Twyfelfontein Rock Art – Twyfelfontein is a World Heritage Site boasting one of the richest rock art concentrations in Africa. Thousands of tourists come to this site each year to view some 2, 500 Stone Age rock engravings. The area is home to 17 rock art sites, which collectively encompass 212 engraved stone slabs. There are an additional 13 sites displaying rock paintings.

After breakfast on day 11 we will depart for a living desert adventure where we will encounter and learn more about the fascinating wildlife of the Namib Desert. We will look for gecko’s, scorpions, side-winder snakes, lizards and beetles as well as the incredible plant life that survives in this harsh environment.

Once we are back in Swakopmund we enjoy lunch and then have the afternoon available to explore the town or perhaps finish the day with a quad-biking and dune-boarding adventure. Other optional activities that could be arranged include scenic flights over the coast and dunes.

The Living Desert Tour is a unique 4×4 adventure which specializes in bringing the desert to life while sharing the awesome beauty of the Namib Desert with travellers from all over the world. The coastal dune belt may seem barren and lifeless to many people, but in fact it is alive with a fascinating variety of little desert adapted animals, which are able to survive on the life-giving fog which consistently rolls in from the cold Atlantic Ocean.
Come see the Dancing White Lady Spider (Carparachne aureoflava) cartwheel 44 turns per second down a dune to escape the enemy. Admire the transparent Namib Dune Gecko (Pachydactylus rangei) with webbed feet that are equivalent to snow shoes. Learn about the different beetles and insects and how they survive in the dune desert. Follow in the tracks of a legless Lizard (Fitsimmon’s Burrowing Skink), observe Sand Diving Lizards (Meroles Anchieta) dancing on the hot sand, Sidewinder Snakes (Perinquey’s Adder), Desert Chameleons and many more fascinating creatures. Learn about the geology, structure and formation of the desert, and admire the vast and beautiful landscapes while enjoying a scenic dune drive combined with fun and adrenalin.

Day 12 – 14 : Sossusvlei Lodge

After a relaxing breakfast we will make our way south, via the Namib Naukluft Park as well as through the Kuiseb and Gaub Canyons. We will reach our accommodation as the sun is disappearing behind the horizon, painting the surrounding sand dunes flaming red. A nice dinner and an early bed time will endure that we have enough energies for the early start tomorrow. Sossusvlei is where you will find the iconic red sand dunes of the Namib. The clear blue skies contrast with the giant red sand dunes to make this one of the natural wonders of Africa and a photographer’s heaven. Aside from the attractions at Sossusvlei – Dune 45, Hiddenvlei, Big Daddy and Deadvlei – other attractions in the area include the Sesriem Canyon and Namib-Naukluft National Park, where the mountains of the Namib meet its plains.

Luxury right at the entrance gate to Sesriem Canyon and the famous Sossusvlei.

Situated at the Entrance Gate to the Namib Naukluft Park, Sossusvlei Lodge offers direct access to the towering red sand dunes, the famous pan of Sossusvlei, the scorched black trees of Dead Vlei and the remarkable depths of the Sesriem Canyon.

The Superior Accommodation units at Sossusvlei Lodge feature a patio to enjoy views over the Desert landscapes, a spacious air-conditioned twin-bedded room and a full en-suite bathroom. The Standard Family Units feature two rooms back to back connected by a lockable inter-leading door between the two private bathrooms. An elegant Junior Suite boasts a spacious bedroom, living area, patio with a splash pool, large bathroom and inspiring views.

Experience the true art of Hospitality with the thoughtful touch of attentive staff to contribute to a truly memorable experience. Facilities include a sparkling pool, bar, sundowner deck, beer garden and an al fresco terrace where one can enjoy exquisite food, award-winning wines and magnificent views of the floodlit waterhole.
The Sossusvlei Lodge Adventure Centre provides a range of activities including Guided Excursions to Deadvlei and Sossusvlei, Elim dune walks, Sundowner Trips, Quad Buggy Nature Drives, Hot Air Ballooning, Scenic Flights and much more to explore the area’s natural beauty.

Once again, we will rise before the sun does on day 13, and will be in the vicinity of the world’s highest, bright-red sand dunes when the first rays appear over the horizon. This is a truly magical time of the day here, as the giant, dark shapes suddenly dress in colour and the mosaic of shades and sunlight creates incredible photo opportunities. From our accommodation, we drive in the ancient bed of the extinct Tsauchab River, stopping at every great location, climbing a few dunes and slowly making our way to the world famous Dead Vlei, where red dunes provide a breath taking backdrop to centuries old, dry trees standing in the desert. It will take all morning to explore this true wonderland, so we will only be back at our accommodation after noon. A nice lunch and a siesta will ensure that we are ready for further exploration in the evening, though. At this time, for one last excursion, we visit the 18 million years old and 30 meters deep Sesriem Canyon, carved out by the Tsauchab River while it was still flowing. Just before sunset, we get back to our lodge and prepare for a Farewell Cocktail and Dinner, for which ancient, red sand dunes provide the perfect backdrop. A fantastic way to say good-bye to Namibia, one of the most scenic countries on Earth.

Dune 45 Sossusvlei – named for its location 45 kilometres past the town of Sesriem, Dune 45 is renowned for its elegant shape, which – along with its position close to the road – have earned it the distinction of ‘most photographed dune in the world’. If you’re not keen for the strenuous hike to the top of Big Daddy, Dune 45 is a more forgiving alternative, standing at only 80 metres and featuring a much gentler gradient.

Sossusvlei is where you will find the iconic red sand dunes of the Namib. The clear blue skies contrast with the giant red sand dunes to make this one of the natural wonders of Africa and a photographer’s heaven. Aside from the attractions at Sossusvlei – Dune 45, Hiddenvlei, Big Daddy and Deadvlei – other attractions in the area include the Sesriem Canyon and Namib-Naukluft National Park, where the mountains of the Namib meet its plains.

Day 14 : transit

After breakfast we will depart Windhoek and unless you have an evening flight home you will spend one night in a Hotel located in the centre of the city. This will be the perfect opportunity for some last minute curio shopping. This is the official end of our voyage, thank you for joining us and have a safe flight home.

Optional – Not included:

Namib Sky Balloon Safaris – situated in the heart of the Namib Naukluft Park, Sossusvlei, one of the most fascinating landscapes in Namibia, is a photographer’s dream. Gigantic orange dunes, dramatic shadows, undulating plains and rocky mountains create a magical kaleidoscope of colours and shapes. To the east, Namib Rand Nature Reserve vast sandy plains are surrounded by towering granite mountains and rolling dunes.

Here, in the oldest desert on the planet, amazingly adapted animals and plants come together to form one of the most visually stunning ecosystems in the world. And truly the best way to experience the heart of the Namib desert is with a hot air balloon safari.

Watching the spectacular sunrise over this magnificent landscape from a silent hot air balloon is the experience of a lifetime, never to be forgotten. At landing, you come back to earth with an “Out Of Africa” style Champagne breakfast set up in the middle of nowhere.

Your pilot will present you with a flight certificate before you take a leisurely nature drive back to the pick-up point.

Photos

Included

  • Accommodation
  • Breakfast and dinner with the exception of Windhoek and Swakopmund
  • Light Lunch
  • Drinking water in the vehicle
  • Activities as specified in the itinerary
  • Private vehicle
  • Private guide
  • Fuel
  • Park Fees

Excluded

  • Flights
  • Pre-and post-trip accommodation if required
  • Drinks
  • Gratuities
  • Items of a personal nature
  • Dinner at Swakopmund and Windhoek

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